It’s time to reform how probation works in Pennsylvania

TAKE ACTION NOW

When a person is given a probation sentence in Pennsylvania, they can find themselves trapped in a system that is built for them to fail. The person may not be incarcerated in a jail or prison, but because they are under carceral supervision in the community, they must be always mindful of the many trip wires that can land them behind bars, even if they haven’t committed a new crime. And that supervision can go on indefinitely.

For the first time in years, we have an opportunity to reform how probation works in Pennsylvania. A bipartisan group of state senators have introduced legislation to change the rules on probation sentencing to help people get back on their feet and get free of the criminal legal system. The bill includes:

  • A cap on the length of probation sentences. Pennsylvania is one of eight states with no maximum sentence for probation.
  • The chance to end a person’s sentence early if they have no violations.
  • Significant limitations on incarcerating a person for probation violations that are not new crimes.
  • Retroactivity for people who are currently incarcerated for probation violations.

Your state senator needs to hear your support loud and clear to ensure that this bill passes. Contact your state senator and tell them to vote YES on Senate Bill 14.

Message Recipients:
Your State Senator

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Your Message

Probation sentences in Pennsylvania can keep a person indefinitely trapped in a cycle of government supervision. Sentences can go on without end, and a person can be incarcerated for behavior that wouldn’t be a crime if they weren’t on probation. I’m grateful that a bipartisan group of senators have introduced legislation to fix this problem. Please vote “yes” on Senate Bill 14.

Senate Bill 14 fixes many of these problems by creating a less oppressive system in which a person can actually get back on their feet and get on with their life. Please vote “yes” on SB 14.

Sincerely,

[First Name] [Last Name]
[Your Address]

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